The View From 1776

A Lament For Freedom Of Belief And Expression That No Longer Exists

Politically-correct liberal-progressives strive to revive the Inquisition.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 08/03 at 07:10 PM
  1. Why Mr. Curry is spending time ruminating on whether the phrase "Its a free country" has the same meaning as the phrase "It is what it is" indicates that he may be losing his grip.

    Those cliches clearly express two completely unrelated thoughts.

    Perhaps in a follow-up column Mr. Curry could explore why we don't hear "23 Skidoo!", or "I love my wife, but oh you kid!" anymore either.

    Most tired expressions eventually lose their impact through overuse and fall on the linguistic trash dump. R.I.P.
    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  08/08  at  08:14 PM
  2. Mr. Jay, snark is not the equivalent of analysis.
    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  08/09  at  11:48 PM
  3. Dear Mr. Jay,

    Thanks for taking the time to reply. Can you spare another minute?

    Re R.I.P. When you say "It's a free country" is a tired expression which belongs on the linguistic trash heap, you seem to go beyond simply agreeing that it has dropped away; you give the impression that you are somehow offended by the phrase, though it is difficult for me to understand why that would be the case.

    Does it offend you?

    Is there something about the phrase itself that bothers you?

    I would appreciate hearing back from you on this point.
    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  08/12  at  11:57 AM
  4. Thomas has the right of J. Jay. He’s not trying to add anything new or constructive to the conversation. His only interest is to disrupt the conversation and disparage anything we conservatives have to say on any subject. His opposition is welcome when he actually says something (however oppositional) of merit. Even the smarminess would then be tolerable. The trouble is, it is rare he has an actual argument or makes a real case for his side. That leaves only the ‘snarkiness’.

    Perhaps J. Jay should take his own advice and consider: does “It’s a free country” have the same meaning [and weight] as “It is what it is”. Mr. Curry is quite right that the latter expression has supplanted the former in our common usage, and they are not unrelated as Jay assumes. “It’s a free country” has a long history in this country, and is bound up with our American sense of freedom, of what it means to be ‘free’. “It’s what it is” reflects a major shift in cultural self-awareness; suggesting we no longer assume ourselves free to speak our minds. “It’s what it is” suggests resignation and a powerlessness as individuals, which the former expression never conveyed. “It’s a free country” conveys respect for the opinions of others, while subtly (and effectively) reminding us that system upon which such toleration was made possible is worth preserving and protecting. “It’s a free county”, therefore, is more than just an expression. It is also an assertion. It is a promise made to future generations they too will have the same freedom to express their opinions, however unpopular. “It’s what it is” conveys only resignation.
    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  08/13  at  06:23 AM
  5. [oops - missing a final sentence to my above post]

    It is no longer "a free country", it is just "what it is".
    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  08/13  at  06:29 AM
  6. J. Jay,

    When you say "Most tired expressions eventually lose their impact through overuse and fall on the linguistic trash dump. R.I.P.", are you saying 'freedom' is a tired idea justifying its relegation to the trash heap of history? If it has been so relegated, don't you think we should go 'dumpster diving' to salvage it? If not, why not? Are you tired of being free to express yourself? Would you prefer being muzzled and terrified into submission?
    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  08/13  at  06:39 AM
  7. Dear Bob S.,

    “It’s what it is” suggests resignation and a powerlessness as individuals, which the former expression never conveyed. “It’s a free country” conveys respect for the opinions of others, while subtly (and effectively) reminding us that system upon which such toleration was made possible is worth preserving and protecting."

    I think you have this just right, and well-expressed also.

    Thanks!
    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  on  08/17  at  12:30 PM
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