The View From 1776

Sensitive PC is Alive and Kicking on College Campuses

      http://www.thomasbrewton.com/index.php/weblog/sensitive_pc_is_alive_and_kicking_on_college_campuses/

Professor Ellis Sandoz, director of the Eric Voegelin Institute at Louisiana State University, alerted me to the following piece.

George Orwell observed that those who control interpretation of the past are in the best position to control the future. 

America’s colleges and universities, dominated by liberal-socialists, are deliberately emulating the Soviet technique of erasing documents about and photographs of persons deemed enemies of the states, making them unpersons.  By deleting the truth about our past and especially about the Judeo-Christian ethos of the founding generations from 1620 until 1787, they clear the field for inculcating the religion of socialism.


Military History chair funded by Stephen Ambrose Remains Vacant at Wisconsin (Madison)

Source: John J. Miller at National Review Online (10-9-06)

A decade ago, best-selling author Stephen Ambrose donated $250,000 to the University of Wisconsin, his alma mater, to endow a professorship in American military history. A few months later, he gave another $250,000. Until his death in 2002, he badgered friends and others to contribute additional funds. Today, more than $1 million sits in a special university account for the Ambrose-Heseltine Chair in American History, named after its main benefactor and the long-dead professor who trained him.

The chair remains vacant, however, and Wisconsin is not currently trying to fill it. “We won’t search for a candidate this school year,” says John Cooper, a history professor. “But we’re committed to doing it eventually.” The ostensible reason for the delay is that the university wants to raise even more money, so that it can attract a top-notch senior scholar. There may be another factor as well: Wisconsin doesn’t actually want a military historian on its faculty. It hasn?t had one since 1992, when Edward M. Coffman retired. “His survey course on U.S. military history used to overflow with students,” says Richard Zeitlin, one of Coffman’s former graduate teaching assistants. “It was one of the most popular courses on campus.” Since Coffman left, however, it has been taught only a couple of times, and never by a member of the permanent faculty.

One of these years, perhaps Wisconsin really will get around to hiring a professor for the Ambrose-Heseltine chair. But right now, for all intents and purposes, military history in Madison is dead. It’s dead at many other top colleges and universities as well. Where it isn’t dead and buried, it’s either dying or under siege. Although military history remains incredibly popular among students who fill lecture halls to learn about Saratoga and Iwo Jima and among readers who buy piles of books on Gettysburg and D-Day, on campus it’s making a last stand against the shock troops of political correctness. “Pretty soon, it may become virtually impossible to find military-history professors who study war with the aim of understanding why one side won and the other side lost,” says Frederick Kagan, a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute who taught at West Point for ten years. That’s bad news not only for those with direct ties to this academic sub-discipline, but also for Americans generally, who may find that their collective understanding of past military operations falls short of what the war-torn present demands. ...

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