The View From 1776

Our Unconstitutionally Established Religion Of Socialism

      http://www.thomasbrewton.com/index.php/weblog/our-unconstitutionally-established-religion-of-socialism/

Is socialism a secular religion?  And is inculcating it at public expense in our schools violating the First Amendment’s prohibition of establishing a religion?

Socialist intellectuals have repeatedly affirmed that socialism is a religion, not just an economic doctrine.

The late Bertrand Russell, one of the world’s most prominent spokesmen for socialism, said of the World War I German socialist party,

For Social Democracy is not a mere political party, nor even a mere economic theory; it is a complete self-contained philosophy of the world and of human development; it is, in a word, a religion and an ethic. To judge the work of Marx, or the aims and beliefs of his followers, from a narrow economic standpoint, is to overlook the whole body and spirit of their greatness. (from Lecture One, German Social Democracy).

Liberal-progressive historian Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., notes in The Politics of Upheaval that Mussolini in 1931 referred to communism and fascism as the new socialist religions with the power to move mountains by faith.

Irving Howe was a leading New York socialist intellectual after World War II, as well as the founding editor of Dissent magazine. In A Margin of Hope: An Intellectual Autobiography, he wrote,

Call it liberal, call it social democratic, a politics devoted to incremental reform even while still claiming a utopian vision— how can such a politics satisfy that part of our imagination still hungering for religious exaltation, still drawn to gestures of heroic violence, still open to the temptations of the apocalypse? ... Perhaps it was recognition of this fact that led the leadership of the European social democracy in the years just before the First World War to maintain some of the “revolutionary” symbols and language of early Marxism, though their parties had ceased to be revolutionary in any serious respect. Intuitively they grasped that the parties they led were not just political movements but, in some sense, branches of a “church” ...

In A Yippie Manifesto, published in May 1969, Jerry Rubin wrote,

America and the West suffer from a great spiritual crisis. And so the yippies are a revolutionary religious movement… A religious-political movement is concerned with people’s souls, with the creation of a magic world which we make real… We offer: sex, drugs, rebellion, heroism, brotherhood. They offer: responsibility, fear, puritanism, repression.

Rubin was a founder of the Yippies (Youth International Party) and one of the more prominent student radicals in the mid-1960s protesting the Vietnam War at the University of California - Berkeley.

Liberal jihadists are intent upon transforming the United States, both culturally and economically. Liberals are not just employing the democratic process to advocate policy modifications. They are motivated by their intensely religious drive to change American society into a collectivized, socialistic state in which an intellectual elite will regulate all aspects of your life. 

Current examples are ObamaCare and EPA regulations designed to destroy the coal industry and impede petroleum exploration and development, along with mandates eventually forcing everyone to buy unsafe, uneconomical, and difficult to use “green” automobiles.

The liberal-progressive jihadists’ picture of the world and of human nature is the opposite of the understanding upon which the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution are based. Jihadists, therefore, necessarily must work to destroy the original ideas of individual moral responsibility under a government of limited powers. Their secular religion of socialism teaches that human beings and human societies can be made perfect when societies are correctly restructured and regulated in ways that only the intellectuals understand.

Liberal-progressive-socialism’s religiosity explains two of its most pronounced characteristics: first, its rule-or-ruin nature, and second, the willingness of its followers to keep pushing an ideology that always fails to live up to its own mythology.